@SPorterEdu

Teaching, Learning & Research

Posts tagged ‘Maths teacher’

At the moment, I have to say that I really like #TakeAwayHmk (@TeacherToolkit).  A colleague and I are in the process of trialling this at our school and in a few days, we expect to receive some amazing pieces of work.  This post is the first of two and for that reason, it’s a relatively short one.

The Why, How and What of homework.

  • Why do I set homework? So that my students can consolidate learning, prepare for lessons, check understanding…
  • How do I set homework? Dependent upon the topic it might be a piece of on-line homework, it may be a question to ponder in readiness for a class discussion or it may even be a traditional worksheet! Our homework policy requires that Maths homework is set weekly and like many teachers, I try my best! 
  • What are the outcomes?  A selection of homework ranging from a scrap of paper with some answers to some beautifully presented pieces with worked solutions.

Consider #TakeAwayHmk and the possible rise in the quantity and quality of homework that a teacher receives.  Some students will produce animations, others 3D models and some may even produce a really neat set of revision cards or a booklet.  So how do I fairly assess this work?  I need a plan!

she needed a plan

Hugh MacLeod – Gaping Void

Marking #TakeAwayHmk

Now this is where it gets interesting.  I’ve had the lesson with my class and have collected all 32 pieces of homework.  I’m poised for the epic session of marking…

  • Do I give one mark for each key word?
  • Should I mark down poor spelling?
  • Is the quantity an issue?  (Will a student get a higher mark because they’ve produced more work)
  • Should I award a particularly able student top marks for a piece of work that is very good but not challenging enough for them?
  • Conversely, should I award marks to a student who I know has tried really hard but has not quite produced the goods?

What do I do?

I’m interested in finding out how teachers assess the #TakeAwayHmk that they have set.  So my question to you is this; How are you marking your #takeawayhmk?

If you or a colleague use #TakeAwayHmk, it would be great if could leave a comment with what you do or send me a direct message via Twitter @sporteredu .  Either way, thanks for reading and please look out for #TakeAwayHmk Pt 2; The meat on the bones!  By then, I will have presented at a TeachMeet, conducted some more research and will have had many discussions with teachers; definitely more meat!

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Writing in Mathematics as opposed to Literacy in Mathematics, is my focus here. This post is not a rant but instead a reflection on my expectations of students work.  Recently, I was observed with a particularly able Mathematics class and as a result, an area that I need to work on is feedback and bookwork; ensuring that my students writing is good or better!

My aim is to share my thoughts and search out ways of improving writing in my lessons as well as the lessons of those teachers who I support in my home school and in the wider setting of our learning federation.

“You write like a toddler!”
Sounds like a comment that a student would teasingly say to a fellow student, right?  Wrong!  These were the actual words that fell from a colleagues mouth (or should I say, crashed into the room) and still reverberate in my ears today!  This response was given after a year 11 student bravely went up to the board to label a set of axes.  My first thought was this, ‘give the kid a break!’ and the second was ‘does it really matter as we can all read it?’.  I know that I would not have made this statement, even if that was what I was thinking but does this mean that I have low standards? Has my level of tolerance changed since working with children? Are my expectations of writing lower because I teach Maths and not English? I’m going to consider this and and break down my thoughts for you.

Research – Students thoughts on writing
Some students struggle to write and I’ve witnessed pages in Maths lessons where the writing is oversized or ridiculously small.  “What is the research evidence on writing?” by the Department for Education is a good read and looks at whole school approaches, intervention and gender differences too.  The following table is from this report.

DfE Research Report Nov 2012

The fourth item was of particular interest to me as a teacher of Mathematics “A pupil who writes well gets better marks than someone that doesn’t“.  I tell students that the examiners don’t know them and that they need to ensure that their writing is clear but they don’t all listen.  I’m starting to think that they do listen and they just can’t help themselves; this is their best writing.  But should I or an examiner be marking them down for the way that they form their ‘a’ or their ‘9’?  I hate to say it but it is going to happen if the work is not legible.

Do you really hold your pen like that?
I’ve seen students holding their pens as though they were in the midst of hollowing out a pumpkin or stirring a bowl of soup but they are still able to write legibly. So does it really matter how you hold your writing implement? Having thought about it over the past few days, I’d say yes.   I say it matters because this may lead to problems and injuries with these students hands, arms (and posture) and could lead to students not being able to sit through the marathon exams (1 hour and 30 minutes or more, of diehard writing).  Poor writing technique has got to be similar to the effects of having poor posture, which most of us correct in students “don’t slouch”, “try to sit up straight”, “…don’t bend like that or you will hurt your back!”.  I can’t remember saying “don’t grip your pen so tightly!”, or “make sure you thumb is lined up with you forearm”, to a student.  Should I, as a teacher of Mathematics be looking out for these things or even making students aware by mentioning this to them?  To be honest I don’t know.  If you are interested,  RJBlain provides photographs and details of what you should look out for.

Tools to help children write well.

Tools to help improve writing.

I remember having handwriting lessons when I was at junior school but nothing at secondary.  I imagine it’s the same now (primary teachers please correct me if I’m wrong), where students are taught how to hold a pen in KS2 but by KS3 if they have not mastered it, not much time (if any) is allocated to this skill.  If you have students (or your own child) that struggle to hold a pen/pencil comfortably and you don’t know how to help, visit Draw Your World.  They have useful information on what to do as well as tools to help improve writing.

Modelling
When I first started teaching, one of the things that really let me down was my board work; it was a mess!  Whatever, I was thinking and deemed important for students to get into their books, I would add to the board …”don’t forget to put this down too”.  I remember clearly when things changed.

My university mentor (an amazing lady and educationalistLaurinda Brown) had visited me at one of my placements to observe a lesson.  We were reviewing the lesson and she asked me to get a few books. I didn’t see where she was going with this until I looked at the books and then looked up at the board…you guessed it. The students had copied the board to their books and it was not good.  Consequently, I regularly step back from the board to ensure my work looks tidy and on occasion will sketch out what I intend to write if I’m using two boards (whiteboard and projected images).

By ensuring that my board work looks good, I expect my students to follow my lead, but my recent observation flagged this.  How can I get my students to write better and make their work more presentable?  Should I really push for all students to have the same style of writing?  Some primary schools insist on students taking one square per digit / letter in their Maths books.

Each digit and letter needs to be two squares high please, anything else is unacceptable…I will be checking and measuring this with a ruler!

I will continue to request and expect a high standard of layout and presentation from my students but I may have to steal/photocopy a few pages of work to display as exemplars.  Hopefully this will prompt other students to get their work to a similar high quality.

So to conclude…
Practice makes perfect; students need to write daily.   I will make writing an integral part of my lessons and persevere when the class moans and groans “…but Miss, this is a Maths lesson NOT an English lesson!”.  I need to practice (or should that be practise with an s?) my writing on paper and guarantee that when I give any written feedback in my students book, it is legible, even when I am tired.

Wish me luck in my next observation; I expect my students books to be…

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There have been some great #Nuture1314 posts by English, PE and History teachers, but I’ve not seen many by the Mathematicians.  This is my second blog and I’m a Maths teacher and hopefully, this will be one of many.  I’ve got to say that it’s not been as easy as I thought.  Here it is…

2013 

  1. New Year – New school, students, colleagues, job role and responsibility.  Pow!  Hit the ground running?  Understatement.  I have been busy every day but it’s been rewarding.
  2. Students – Even though I have been one of many Maths teachers for most of my classes (since I started in January 2013), I have gained the trust of my students.   It’s been up and down at times but they know that I care, they know that I’m fair and best of all (as far as they are concerned), I’m prepared to have a sing and a laugh.
  3. Gaining accreditation as a Specialist Leader of Education (some of my colleagues laughed and thought I was mad to want to take a position of responsibility with no payment).  It has been hard work but I’ve enjoyed it.  There have been a lot of opportunities to work with teachers from other schools and in other subject areas – this has helped me grow as an individual and as a teacher.
  4. Starting a new job as a Lead Practitioner in Mathematics in a new school.  This was a little scary as I knew what was expected but was still struggling to get my head around what to do on day 1.  Having to hit the ground running and share ways of improving Teaching & Learning, has been a challenge.  I’m getting better but I can see where I need to improve.
  5. Working outside of my comfort zone (well, outside of the Cabot Learning Federation).  I was nervous, I didn’t know anyone but I ‘performed’ well.  I’ve run workshops before and since, but I’ve always presented to Secondary School Mathematics Teachers.  Researching and delivering a workshop on Behaviour for Learning to Primary & Secondary Teachers and across varied subject areas actually wasn’t as scary as I thought it would be.
  6. Workshops for the CLF – Led three different workshops in one day (with the support of my Principal, a Vice Principal and a Head of Science, I did it!)
  7. Getting involved in a research project.   At the back end of 2013 I got involved in a research project funded by the NCETM.   It’s been good finding out what differences there are between the teaching of Mathematics in Secondary Schools as opposed  to what my colleagues are currently doing in Primary.
  8. Never Stop Learning – @MrOCallaghanEdu asked me if I wanted to work with a team of Pedagogy Leaders and I said yes.  It’s his baby, his brand and a great idea.  I can’t wait for the Genius Cafe and the Teach Meet in 2014 @NSLHub.  Thanks for introducing me to Twitter and Blogging…
  9. Twitter – I kept saying that I’d look into it and I am glad I have.  It’s been good to share and obtain tips from other like minded individuals.  It has provided some great links to resources, blogs and more.
  10. Blogging – I can’t say that I had planned to do it but it has made me think carefully about my views, what I want to say and not what others think I should be saying.  I just want to keep writing…yup, I know, it doesn’t sound like a comment a Maths teacher would make.
  11. Coaching & Mentoring – Amidst the myriad of tasks, I am an NQT mentor and a coach for a PGCE student (via a Teaching School).  There have been tears, a firm word here and there and some advice that has been passed along but I think that my two young ladies are doing an amazing job (I’m just their sounding board and little tweaker).
  12. Smiling and saying hello – This has been a habit of mine for some time now but it’s not something that everyone does.  It’s been good bringing a little cheer to someone’s day and besides, most people can’t resist smiling back (try it!).
  13. Husband – Okay, so this is the one that is the most important.  He’s still here, still supportive and my best friend!  We can even talk Maths together and he’s not a Maths teacher…now that’s grand!

14 Hopes (including a few promises to myself)

  1. Husband – Spend more quality time with the chap…yes I know dear, just one more lesson to plan, just need to finish marking these tests then I’ll be ready…
  2. Weekends & Half Term – I must stop, gather my thoughts, breath and relax (must remember number 1!).
  3. Time ManagementThis is my first blog and pretty much covers what I’m thinking “How-much-time-do-you-need?“.
  4. Homework – Be consistent in setting it for all of my classes.  I must try #takeawayhomework with at least one of my classes.  This is one of the great #100ideas by @TeacherToolkit – still reading)
  5. Speaking – I know that I come across as calm, collected individual but I want (and need) to be a truly confident speaker…I was always a quiet child!
  6. Primary Schools – As part of the NCETM research project, I have been paired up with a primary school in Bristol and we will share teaching experiences as well as visit each other.
  7. Students – Continue helping/guiding them on their journey to being amazing.
  8. Read – I want to read more!
  9. TV – watch less of it.
  10. Bicycle – I have a beautiful bike, I love riding it and need to make sure I either get out on the roads or use that BKool Trainer that I bought last year.
  11. Teach Meet – Attend my first Teach Meet
  12. Twitter & Blogging – I must not give up.
  13. Paper – Make more shapes
  14. Christmas 2014 – Be prepared.
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